Unlocking Mysteries at the New Brunswick Museum: An 18th-century United Empire Loyalist glass plate

PA2015-31(3)

PA2015-31(1)

Maker Unknown (Bohemian School) [possibly the Harrach Factory, Neuwelt, Czech Republic)
Plate, bowl or undertray, before 1789
blown, cut and engraved colourless glass
overall: 3 × 23.5 × 23.5 cm
Gift of Angela Huntjens and Dr. Johannes Huntjens, 2015 (2015.49)
New Brunswick Museum Collection

It is extremely rare for 18th century glass objects to have survived in New Brunswick. It is even more extraordinary for a table service piece, other than a drinking vessel, to have survived with its provenance intact.  A plate from the Colonel Richard Hewlett family donated to the New Brunswick Museum in December 2015 by Angela Huntjens and Dr. Johannes Huntjens is a major addition to the NBM’s collection of Loyalist-era glassware used in the province.

This plate, bowl or undertray is most likely of Bohemian origin. A commentary on this object provided by Ian Simmonds of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, who specializes in the history and interpretation of early American glass, suggested that the piece may be attributable to the Harrach Factory in Neuwelt, Czech Republic. His review indicated that an existing pattern book from the factory shows similar approaches to shape, form and design.

The original owner, Colonel Richard Hewlett, fought in the American Revolutionary War as a Loyalist and settled his family in the Parish of Hampstead (present day Queenstown) after the conflict.  This piece remained in the Hewlett family until about 1906 when it was presented by two descendants as a wedding gift to the local Anglican rector and his wife.

The NBM currently houses half a dozen drinking glasses from the late 18th century and one decanter box containing glasses and bottles – all of which appear to have United Empire Loyalist provenance.  This tray certainly expands the representation of late 18th century luxury wares cherished by those immigrants who came to the province in the years after the American Revolutionary War.

This item also has potential for additional research relating to trading patterns between central Europe and North America in the 18th century.  It is also an excellent comparative example for understanding a variety of glass decorating processes and techniques.

Provenance: Colonel Richard Hewlett (1729-1789) and his wife, Mary Townsend (1734-1819); to their son, Joseph Hewlett (1772-1821) and his wife, Clarissa Winslow (1770-1861); to their son, Captain Thomas Townsend Hewlett (1793-1878) and his wife, Ann Horsfield Sloan (1795-1870); to their daughters, Mary E. Hewlett (1827-1916) and Eliza Winslow Hewlett (1834-1912) until about 1906; a wedding gift to Reverend Canon Mansel Shewen (1876-1951) and his wife , Edith Olivia Bishop; given to Ada Ruth Flemming Thompson (born 1906); to her daughter, Angela Thompson Huntjens and her husband, Dr. Johannes Huntjens.

 

 

Unlocking Mysteries at the New Brunswick Museum: The Mystery of the Dentist’s Bag

Within the New Brunswick Museum’s collections is a dentist bag found in Nanaimo, British Columbia. The dentist’s bag came into the Nanaimo Community Hospice Shoppe in British Columbia. Inside was a copy of a wedding announcement from parents Dr. and Mrs. John T. Hazelwood of their daughter Effie Lucretia Hazelwood’s marriage to John Allen Clowes in October, 1913 in Saint John West, New Brunswick. The New Brunswick Museum was subsequently notified of this by shop manager Daphne Catteson.

Dentist's bag for blog

 

dentist’s bag, c. 1890
leather with metal
overall: 36 x 44 x 21 cm
Gift of the Nanaimo Community Hospice Society, 2015
NBM 2015.20

 

 

How did this dentist’s bag from New Brunswick end up in a shop in British Columbia?

Research by the NBM revealed that John T. Hazelwood was first listed as a dentist in the 1891-92 Saint John City Directory and that previous to this he had been a druggist in the city from 1881 to 1890. According to the New Brunswick Dental Association, John T. Hazelwood was licensed by an Order by the Governor in Council in 1893 but his practice was restricted to certain procedures. His pharmaceutical work may have assisted his entry into the profession. While there was an Ontario Dental Association from 1867 and The Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario the next year, the Canadian Dental Association was only founded in 1902. Hazelwood obviously practiced without a degree and learned on the job within his restricted duties. He did not advertise himself as a doctor in the Saint John City Directory. This is an important reminder of a developing profession.

It was further discovered that Effie Hazelwood and John Clowes subsequently moved to British Columbia and the bag must have travelled with them. Dr. John Hazelwood is listed as a dentist in 1915 but not 1919; he passed away in 1926. The move of the bag to British Columbia would likely postdate his death and perhaps that of his wife Annie Garrison Rouse (d. 1943). John Clowes died in Comox, B.C. in 1945 and Effie Hazelwood in New Westminster in 1969. It’s likely the bag descended to Effie and thereafter to one of their children or a relative and eventually made its way to the Hospice Shoppe.

tag for blog 1

 

A typed note that was found in the bag probably from the last descendent.

tag for blog 2
 

Tag that was on the handle of the bag regarding its lock.

wedding invite for blog

 

 

 

A copy of the wedding announcement found inside the dentist’s bag

 

 

 

Hazelwwod with dog for blog

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. John T. Hazelwood with top hat and his dog, about 1900

parlour for blog
Dr. John T. Hazelwood performing hypnotism on a volunteer in a parlour setting about 1900.